“While you were out…”

As I think more about addressing common User Story pitfalls, what keeps coming to mind is the idea of someone taking and noting a phone call for me while I was out.

I find the greatest challenge with user stories is indeed in writing them “right”.  Many Scrum teams struggle with this ‘staple diet’. Stories are not requirements on cards! (And Scrum is not waterfall on a board with daily status meetings!) As a visual aid to help form a better mindset on the best flavor and smell of user stories – expectations, writing, using, etc. – I offer the following image.

Think placeholder for a conversation...

Think placeholder for a conversation…

As Mike Cohn points out in his book User Stories Applied: For Agile Software Development, user stories are not requirements, they are prompts for a conversation with the customer and/or user. A story card, then, is only a placeholder for follow-up communication, to get confirmation. Paper cards used to note these stories may be useful in this format of a “while you were out” message pad. It contains just enough abstract content as to understand WHO to talk to about WHAT, and ideally WHY (but that can be added later once the reason is communicated and understood.)

So, think “While you were out” during story writing/workshops so there is a backlog of “calls to make” (or conversations to have) in grooming stories for release and/or sprint planning.

Thoughts?

For [much] more on User Stories Applied, see the book of same name by Mike Cohn.

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Scrum Master or Agile Coach, and other coaching categorizations.

This is such a poignant post I have to plug it on my blog. Kudos to you Sandy Mamoli @smamol

Excellent article on distinctions of Agile Coaching un die limited title of Scrum Master. An easy helpful read for all! See the article and supplemental comments here:  http://nomad8.com/types-of-agile-coaches/

Principles and/or Practices?

There are two basic and obvious approaches to looking for a new approach to software development: “Learn-by-doing” and “Understand before doing”.  Combining would be a third approach, and one that I leverage.

Thanks to @mpoppendieck, regarding #Principles and Practices of #Lean Software development, who offers, “We observe that the best results come from combining the two approaches. Copying practices without understanding the underlying principles has a long history of mediocre results. But when the underlying principles are understood, it is useful to copy practices that work for similar organizations and modify them to fit your environment. This can provide a jump-start to implementing the principles. This combination of understanding principles and adapting practices led to dramatic success.” – Mary Poppendiek